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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 3  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 140-144

A study of prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors among the school children of Itahari, Eastern Region of Nepal


1 Department of School of Public Health and Community Medicine, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal
2 Department of Pediatrics, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal
3 Department of Microbiology, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan, Nepal

Correspondence Address:
Ram Bilakshan Sah
School of Public Health and Community Medicine, B.P. Koirala Institute of Health Sciences, Dharan
Nepal
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DOI: 10.4103/2229-5070.122143

PMID: 24470999

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Introduction: Intestinal parasitic infestation is a major public health problem in children of developing countries Because of poor socio-economic conditions and lack of good hygienic living. The aims of this study were to measure the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infestations and to identify risk factors associated with parasitic infestations among the school children of Itahari Municipality. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted in Grade VI, VII and VIII in Government and private schools of Itahari Municipality. Stratified random sampling method was applied to choose the schools and the study subjects. Semi-structured questionnaire was administered to the study subjects and microscopic examination of stool was done. The Chi-square test was used to measure the association of risk factors and parasitic infestation. Results: Overall intestinal parasitic infestation was found to be 31.5%. Around 13% of the study population was found to be infested with helminthes and 18.5% of the study population was protozoa infected. Not using soap after defecation, not wearing sandals, habit of nail biting and thumb sucking were found to be significantly associated with parasitic infection. Conclusions: The prevalence of intestinal parasitic infestation was found to be high in school children of Itahari. Poor sanitary condition, lack of clean drinking water supply and education is supposed to play an important role in establishing intestinal parasitic infections.


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