Tropical Parasitology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2012  |  Volume : 2  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 24--28

Prevalence and intensity of infections of three neglected tropical diseases in patients consulted at a Traditional Health Care Centre in Dschang West Cameroon


J Wabo Pone1, Mpoame Mbida1, P Nkeng Efouet Alango2, CF Bilong Bilong3 
1 Department of Animal Biology, Laboratory of Applied Biology and Ecology (LABEA), Cameroon
2 Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, PO Box 067 Dschang, Cameroon
3 Animal Biology and Physiology, Laboratory of General Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Yaoundé 1, PO Box 812 Yaoundé, Cameroon

Correspondence Address:
J Wabo Pone
Department of Animal Biology, Laboratory of Applied Biology and Ecology (LABEA), Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, PO Box 067 Dschang
Cameroon

Background: In recent times, soil-transmitted helminth (STH) infections seem to loose more and more interest due to the fact that resources are being justifiably diverted to more recent priorities such as HIV/AIDS and malaria. In developing countries, the upsurge of intestinal helminth infections constitutes a problem not only of public health concern but also of development. Aim : To find out the prevalence of STH infections in persons visiting the traditional health care centre in west Cameroon. Materials and Methods: In order to evaluate the prevalence and intensity of STH infections, in persons visiting the centre of phytomedecine, a parasitological investigation of feces was carried out in 223 stools, using three techniques (direct examination, concentration method of Willis, and Mc Master technique). Results: 130 stools were collected from male and 93 from female subjects, hence a sex ratio of 1.4:1. Among the 223 stools examined, 97 specimens were found to be positive with one or several parasite species, thus giving a prevalence of 45.3%. The parasitism occurs from early age (1-10 years) reaching 4.5%. The most infected age group was 21-30 years (31%). Female subjects (28.3%) were statistically more infected than males (15.2%). The intestinal nematode species found were Trichuris trichiura (19.2%), Ascaris lumbricoides (13.4%), and hookworm (10.7%). These parasites occurred as single (19.2%) or multiple infections (10.3%). The mean fecal eggs count was 3722±672, 875±462, and 563±283 for A. lumbricoides, hookworm, and T. trichiura, respectively. Conclusion: These results show the necessity of the application of suitable measures which are aimed at reducing the extent of STH.


How to cite this article:
Pone J W, Mbida M, Alango P N, Bilong CB. Prevalence and intensity of infections of three neglected tropical diseases in patients consulted at a Traditional Health Care Centre in Dschang West Cameroon.Trop Parasitol 2012;2:24-28


How to cite this URL:
Pone J W, Mbida M, Alango P N, Bilong CB. Prevalence and intensity of infections of three neglected tropical diseases in patients consulted at a Traditional Health Care Centre in Dschang West Cameroon. Trop Parasitol [serial online] 2012 [cited 2020 Feb 22 ];2:24-28
Available from: http://www.tropicalparasitology.org/article.asp?issn=2229-5070;year=2012;volume=2;issue=1;spage=24;epage=28;aulast=Pone;type=0