Tropical Parasitology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 95--101

Thrombocytopenia in malaria patients from an arid region of Western Rajasthan (India)


Yashik Bansal1, Vinod Maurya1, Nidhima Aggarwal1, Vibhor Tak1, Vijaya Lakshmi Nag1, Abhishek Purohit2, Akhil Dhanesh Goel3, Gopal Krishna Bohra4, Kuldeep Singh5 
1 Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
2 Department of Pathology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
3 Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
4 Department of General Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India
5 Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India

Correspondence Address:
Vibhor Tak
Department of Microbiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Basni Phase-2, Jodhpur - 342 005, Rajasthan
India

Context: The arid climate of Western Rajasthan is challenging for malaria transmission, with the number of cases correlating directly with the annual rainfall pattern. Moreover, >90% of the cases in this region are caused by Plasmodium vivax, which has recently been shown to cause a similar degree of thrombocytopenia as Plasmodium falciparum. Aims and Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the degree of thrombocytopenia in malaria patients and its association with different species of malaria in this region with an unstable malaria epidemiology. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study was conducted on all microbiologically confirmed malaria patients with documented platelet counts from August 2017 to October 2018. Microbiological diagnosis was established by rapid diagnostic tests and peripheral blood film examination. Platelet counts were used to assess the degree of thrombocytopenia. Results: A total of 130 cases were included in the study, of which 118 (91%) were caused by P. vivax, while the rest 12 (9%) were caused by P. falciparum. Thrombocytopenia was present in 108 (83%) cases, and the mean values of platelets in thrombocytopenic patients with P. vivax and P. falciparum infection were 72600/μL and 48500/μL, respectively. Although P. falciparum infection was significantly associated with severe thrombocytopenia (odds ratio: 4.7, [95% confidence interval 1.3–16.1]), extremely low platelet counts (n = 5) warranting platelet transfusions (n = 1) were seen only in P. vivax cases. Only one patient required platelet transfusions in these patients suggesting good tolerance to thrombocytopenia. Conclusions: Avoiding unnecessary transfusions in febrile thrombocytopenic patients with an established malaria diagnosis can help in reducing transfusion-transmitted infections.


How to cite this article:
Bansal Y, Maurya V, Aggarwal N, Tak V, Nag VL, Purohit A, Goel AD, Bohra GK, Singh K. Thrombocytopenia in malaria patients from an arid region of Western Rajasthan (India).Trop Parasitol 2020;10:95-101


How to cite this URL:
Bansal Y, Maurya V, Aggarwal N, Tak V, Nag VL, Purohit A, Goel AD, Bohra GK, Singh K. Thrombocytopenia in malaria patients from an arid region of Western Rajasthan (India). Trop Parasitol [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Apr 11 ];10:95-101
Available from: https://www.tropicalparasitology.org/article.asp?issn=2229-5070;year=2020;volume=10;issue=2;spage=95;epage=101;aulast=Bansal;type=0